Making An Impact Through Effective Leadership Communication

Effective communication from organizational leaders is needed to establish a transparent, positive work environment. There is a statistically significant correlation between effective workplace communication and employee job satisfaction,1 but communicating effectively and motivating employees is a challenge for many leaders.



In this Best Places to Work in the Federal Government® snapshot, the Partnership for Public Service and Deloitte considered three questions from the Office of Personnel Management’s (OPM) 2013 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey to measure employee satisfaction with leadership communication in their agencies. The questions covered the communication of goals and priorities, the information provided to different work units and employee satisfaction with information they receive regarding what is taking place in the organization.

Based on employees’ responses to these questions, a communications index was created to measure how satisfied employees are with information they are receiving from their senior leaders and managers. To understand recent trends, data from the past five years was analyzed.

Leadership communication and Best Places to Work Index trends


Government-wide Results

Our Best Places to Work analysis shows that employee satisfaction with their leaders’ communication is low and has been dropping on average across the federal government.

The 2013 government-wide leadership communication index score is 50.2 out of 100, indicating that only half of the federal workforce is satisfied with the level of communication it is receiving from those in leadership positions at their agencies. This score represents a 3.9 point drop since 2009.

From 2009 to 2013, more than 60 percent of the agencies for which data are available registered a decrease in satisfaction with leadership communication.2 This result underscores the need for leaders to focus on improving communication with their employees. Overall, the rankings on leadership communication closely mirror the Best Places to Work index rankings, highlighting the link between leadership communication and overall employee satisfaction.

The factors behind the leadership communication scores

Of the three survey questions used to measure federal employee satisfaction with leadership communication, the lowest score was represented by the information employees receive from management on what is going on in their organization. Only 44.8 percent of employees responded positively on this question in 2013 compared to 48.1 percent in 2009, as shown below.

In addition, less than half of federal employees surveyed throughout the federal government are satisfied with the extent to which managers promote communication among work units. The government-wide score on this question dropped from 54.5 percent in 2009 to 48.2 percent in 2013.

At the same time, 57.5 percent believe their managers communicate the goals and priorities of the organization, the highest score of the three questions. The 2013 score, however, represents a 2.2 point decrease from 2009.

Percentage of positive responses government-wide on leadership communication questions

Government trails the private sector

According to data provided by Hay Group, 60 percent of private sector employees are satisfied with the information they receive from management on what is going on in their organization.3 The government’s score on this same question, the only one for which there is comparative data, is 15.2 points lower, highlighting a disparity in satisfaction with this aspect of leadership communication.

Agency highlights

Despite the overall negative trend regarding employee satisfaction with leadership communication across the government, agency-specific results show wide variations in their communications index scores.

Among large agencies, scores range from 68.0 at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) compared to only 38.8 percent at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The scores for mid-size agencies range from 68.8 percent at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) to 41.3 percent at the Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG). Among small agencies, the Surface Transportation Board has a leadership communication score of 75.9, compared to a score of only 34.1 at the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative.

While about half of the agencies for which data were available registered declines in their leadership communication scores from 2012 to 2013, there were several that showed considerable improvement. The leadership communication index score for the Office of the Inspector General in the Department of Commerce, for example, increased by 18.4 points. Additionally, the scores for the U.S. International Trade Commission and two subcomponents within the Department of Justice—the Criminal Division and the Antitrust Division—all increased by more than 11 points.

While there is a tendency in a volatile and uncertain environment to stifle communications, some agency leaders resisted this trend during the last few years of budget cuts, hiring freezes and the government shutdown by increasing their interactions with employees. The agencies that scored high on leadership communication have tended to be proactive, making a concerted effort to keep employees informed and engaged regarding what is taking place within their organizations.

NASA, for example, hosts a Virtual Executive Summit that allows Administrator Charles Bolden to connect with employees using online tools. This initiative demonstrates how agency leaders can leverage technology to engage in meaningful interactions with employees even when these employees are based in diverse geographic locations. NASA’s managers also actively seek employee feedback through focus group and surveys, customizing questions based on their immediate relevance to the agency.

Summary

Low levels of employee satisfaction with leadership communication in 2013 go hand-in-hand with lower employee satisfaction scores across-the-board. While some agencies have prioritized effective leadership communication, government-wide satisfaction levels on leadership communication have decreased in recent years. Agencies will need to make a concerted effort to increase leadership communication in order to reverse this negative trend.

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Steps You Can Take to Improve the Impact of Your Leadership

The Best Places to Work trends indicate a decline in employee satisfaction with leadership communication across government, a worrisome sign since leadership communication can have a significant impact on employee attitudes toward their jobs and workplaces. Leaders should take affirmative steps to keep employees better informed about organizational and work unit goals and activities. Increased efforts to effectively communicate with employees can help improve job and workplace satisfaction and, ultimately, employee commitment and productivity.

Below are some approaches to consider to improve the effectiveness of leadership communication. These approaches are based on actions taken by some of the most improved and best performing agencies that the Partnership for Public Service has highlighted over the years in the Best Places to Work rankings as well as in the 2013 report by the Partnership and Deloitte, “Ten Years of the Best Places to Work in the Federal Government® Rankings.”

Make communication a consistent priority for leadership

Establishing effective leadership communication does not happen overnight. In order to effectively drive communication, agency leaders must consistently focus on improving and maintaining quality communication, not just engaging in short-lived initiatives.

The FDIC, for example, established leadership communication as a key agency priority by launching regular initiatives that put employees directly in contact with the agency’s leaders on a regular basis. Leaders began holding quarterly call-ins where employees from around the country can speak directly with the agency’s chairman. These call-ins are unscripted, allowing employees to ask any questions they have and obtain answers directly from agency leadership. The agency also holds both virtual and in-person town hall meetings, creating multiple venues where employees can receive information from senior leadership.

Communicate with employees through multiple platforms

Not all employees prefer to receive and convey information through the same medium. In order to effectively communicate with all staff, agency leaders should strive to communicate with employees through multiple platforms. From more conventional means of leadership communication, such as one-on-one discussions and emails, to more innovative communication methods, such as video conferencing and social media, leaders should leverage a range of platforms to communicate with employees.

The management at the U.S. Mint, for example, uses multiple communications platforms to increase internal communication. While the public affairs office leverages electronic communications such as an internal television network and an online question and answer box, it also provides print-outs of online content in common areas to ensure that all employees have access to information from agency leadership.

Maintain open and direct communication between managers and employees

Effective communication is only possible when agency leadership—from senior leaders to managers—maintains open, direct lines with employees. Agencies can foster open leadership communication in many ways, from holding regular town hall meetings and hosting office hours where employees meet directly with leaders, to organizing webinars that allow leaders to overcome geographical hurdles and engage employees located outside agency headquarters.

The chairman of the Federal Labor Relations Authority demonstrated her commitment to open communication by holding town hall meetings for all employees, including employees at regional offices across the country. The agency also has put in place regular meetings where leadership shares information and directly solicits ideas from employees for improvement. These strategies give employees a direct line of contact with the agency leadership.

Implement employee suggestions to convey commitment to communication

Soliciting employees’ opinions is an initial step toward improving agency communication. Simply collecting these ideas, though, does little to improve satisfaction if employees believe agency leadership does not receive and use their feedback. When leaders utilize ideas generated by agency staff, however, employees receive a clear message that their voice is both heard and valued.

The Department of Transportation (DOT) launched an online community, IdeaHub, where agency employees can submit and collaborate on ideas to drive innovation and change. Once these ideas are refined, they are communicated online to everyone at the agency and to the individual who originally submitted the idea. By not only collecting, but implementing employee ideas and communicating this information back to agency staff, DOT’s leadership demonstrates that communication with employees is taken seriously.

Consider a holistic framework

Adopting a strategic approach to improving leadership communication can be an effective way to drive change in an agency. Deloitte outlined four key stages as part of a holistic framework to foster effective communication.4 First, agencies should assess the state of communication within the organization, taking stock of employee concerns and the agency’s current communications strategy. This initial assessment allows agency leaders to develop goals for improving communication moving forward, possibly including metrics to gauge progress and guidelines for advancing communication. After formulating this strategy, the agency can develop and begin using new communications channels. Once these strategies are in place, agencies can further improve the effectiveness of leadership communication by measuring the success of these new approaches and by revising these strategies as needed based on employee feedback. By approaching communication strategically, leaders can more effectively and systematically improve leadership communication.

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Large agency leadership communication rankings

Rank Agency Leadership Communication Score (2013) Point Change (2012-2013)
1 National Aeronautics and Space Administration 68.0 1.9
2 Intelligence Community 61.8 0.6
3 Department of the Treasury 58.0 -2.0
4 Social Security Administration 57.3 -3.7
5 Department of Commerce 56.7 0.8
6 Department of the Navy 52.9 -0.3
7 Office of the Secretary of Defense, Joint Staff, Defense Agencies, and Department of Defense Field Activities 52.7 0.0
8 Department of State 52.6 -2.5
9 Department of Health and Human Services 51.7 -0.2
9 Department of Transportation 51.7 1.1
11 Department of the Air Force 51.3 -1.5
12 Department of Justice 51.2 0.9
13 Department of Labor 50.4 -0.2
14 Environmental Protection Agency 49.6 -3.9
15 Department of the Army 49.2 -2.5
16 Department of Veterans Affairs 48.3 1.9
17 Department of Agriculture 47.0 0.1
18 Department of the Interior 46.7 -1.3
19 Department of Homeland Security 38.8 -3.8
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Mid-size agency leadership communication rankings

Rank Agency Leadership Communication Score (2013) Point Change (2012-2013)
1 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 68.8 -2.0
2 Nuclear Regulatory Commission 65.9 -2.0
3 Federal Trade Commission 64.6 -0.2
4 Federal Communications Commission 60.5 7.0
5 Office of Personnel Management 60.2 1.3
6 National Credit Union Administration 59.7 -4.9
7 General Services Administration 58.8 -0.7
8 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 58.7 2.8
9 Government Printing Office 57.4 --
10 Small Business Administration 55.5 2.0
11 U.S. Agency for International Development 54.4 -2.4
12 Equal Employment Opportunity Commission 54.3 -0.3
13 Department of Education 54.1 1.0
14 Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency 51.6 -0.5
15 National Science Foundation 51.1 2.5
16 Department of Energy 50.6 -1.0
17 National Labor Relations Board 48.8 -0.1
18 National Archives and Records Administration 45.8 1.1
19 Securities and Exchange Commission 44.8 2.2
20 Department of Housing and Urban Development 44.7 -6.9
21 Broadcasting Board of Governors 41.3 3.8
N/A Government Accountability Office -- --
N/A Smithsonian Institution -- --

-- Not available

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Small agency leadership communication rankings

Rank Agency Leadership Communication Score (2013) Point Change (2012-2013)
1 Surface Transportation Board 75.9 1.1
2 Federal Labor Relations Authority 73.7 1.0
3 Overseas Private Investment Corporation 70.3 -3.9
4 Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service 69.3 4.1
5 National Endowment for the Humanities 66.4 7.6
6 Peace Corps 65.7 -2.5
7 Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board 65.3 1.9
8 Selective Service System 62.1 3.0
9 U.S. International Trade Commission 60.2 11.4
10 Railroad Retirement Board 54.8 1.2
11 National Endowment for the Arts 54.2 7.0
12 Millennium Challenge Corporation 53.9 1.8
13 Merit Systems Protection Board 53.1 -1.7
14 Corporation for National and Community Service 52.8 -0.7
15 Office of Special Counsel 52.1 -2.2
16 Consumer Product Safety Commission 51.4 4.0
17 Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation 50.9 -7.0
18 Office of Management and Budget 50.7 -5.0
19 National Gallery of Art 49.2 3.3
20 Federal Housing Finance Agency 47.4 7.6
21 International Boundary and Water Commission 45.9 2.1
22 National Transportation Safety Board 45.0 -5.6
22 Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 45.0 -25.0
24 Federal Election Commission 44.7 2.8
25 Commodity Futures Trading Commission 44.6 -6.1
26 Export-Import Bank of the United States 39.8 -6.7
27 Federal Maritime Commission 37.0 1.0
28 Office of the U.S. Trade Representative 34.1 9.1
N/A Farm Credit Administration -- --

-- Not available

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Agency subcomponent leadership communication rankings

Rank Agency Leadership Communication Score (2013) Point Change (2012-2013)
1 John C. Stennis Space Center (NASA) 77.9 2.3
2 George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA) 73.8 3.9
3 Federal Highway Administration (DOT) 73.2 2.5
4 Patent and Trademark Office (Commerce) 72.5 1.9
5 Office of the Inspector General (DOT) 71.6 2.7
5 Office of the Inspector General (GSA) 71.6 9.9
7 Office of the Inspector General (Treasury) 71.4 5.0
8 Civil Division (DOJ) 71.2 3.1
9 Office of the Inspector General for Tax Administration (Treasury) 71.0 3.6
9 Bureau of Economic Analysis (Commerce) 71.0 6.5
11 Naval Reserve Force (Navy) 70.2 10.7
12 Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA) 69.4 0.8
13 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (NASA) 69.2 -0.4
14 John F. Kennedy Space Center (NASA) 69.1 4.0
15 Office of the Executive Director (FERC) 69.0 --
16 Air Force Office of Special Investigations (Air Force) 67.5 5.2
17 Naval Special Warfare Command (Navy) 67.3 -1.7
18 Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (Treasury) 66.9 -0.2
18 Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development (ED) 66.9 --
20 Employee Services (OPM) 66.8 -2.3
21 Merit System Audit and Compliance (OPM) 66.7 --
22 Langley Research Center (NASA) 66.6 -0.3
23 Office of the Inspector General (Interior) 66.2 2.8
24 John Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field (NASA) 66.1 5.3
25 Field Operating Offices of Office of the Secretary of the Army (Army) 65.8 -2.4
26 Office of the General Counsel (FERC) 65.5 --
27 Bureau of Industry and Security (Commerce) 65.4 7.0
28 Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (Treasury) 65.0 -2.8
29 Defense Contract Audit Agency (DOD) 64.9 1.6
30 Office of the Inspector General (VA) 64.7 -1.1
30 Healthcare and Insurance (OPM) 64.7 --
30 Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OPM) 64.7 --
33 Office of the Inspector General (OPM) 64.6 --
34 Office of the Inspector General (ED) 64.5 1.6
35 Environment and Natural Resources Division (DOJ) 64.2 -1.8
35 Air Force Elements, U.S. Transportation Command (Air Force) 64.2 7.6
37 Facilities - Security - Contracting (OPM) 64.0 --
38 U.S. Air Forces, Europe (Air Force) 63.9 7.8
39 Economic Research Service (USDA) 63.3 2.3
40 Defense Security Service (DOD) 63.0 7.5
41 Civilian Career Training (Air Force) 62.6 -0.5
42 Federal Railroad Administration (DOT) 62.3 0.9
43 Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (HHS) 62.1 0.8
44 Office of the Chief Financial Officer (ED) 61.7 -5.9
44 Joint Activities (Army) 61.7 9.4
46 Health Resources and Services Administration (HHS) 61.6 1.0
47 Dryden Flight Research Center (NASA) 61.4 5.1
48 Headquarters (NASA) 61.3 -1.8
49 Research and Innovative Technology Administration (DOT) 61.2 -1.9
49 HR Solutions (OPM) 61.2 3.1
51 Federal Acquisition Service (GSA) 61.1 0.0
51 Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DHS) 61.1 --
53 Ames Research Center (NASA) 60.7 3.5
54 Office of Enforcement (FERC) 60.6 --
55 Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (DOT) 60.5 -0.9
56 Pretrial Services Agency (CSOSA) 60.2 -0.8
57 Office of the Inspector General (USDA) 60.0 0.5
57 Tax Division (DOJ) 60.0 3.5
59 Office of the Inspector General (EPA) 59.9 -5.2
60 Region 3 - Philadelphia (EPA) 59.8 -0.6
61 Defense Logistics Agency (DOD) 59.6 1.4
61 Region 4 - Atlanta (EPA) 59.6 4.2
63 Office of the Chief Financial Officer (GSA) 59.1 3.0
63 Office of Governmentwide Policy (GSA) 59.1 3.7
65 Bonneville Power Administration (DOE) 58.8 0.5
65 Retirement Services (OPM) 58.8 2.6
67 Office of Administration and Resources Management (EPA) 58.7 -0.7
67 Federal Investigative Service (OPM) 58.7 1.1
67 Office of the Chief Information Officer (ED) 58.7 --
70 Office of Field Policy and Management (HUD) 58.3 -5.7
71 Internal Revenue Service (Treasury) 57.9 -2.3
71 Naval Education and Training Command (Navy) 57.9 -0.5
73 Bureau of Engraving and Printing (Treasury) 57.8 6.3
74 Strategic Systems Programs Office (Navy) 57.7 -1.9
75 Public Buildings Service (GSA) 57.6 -2.1
76 U.S. Army Accessions Command (Army) 57.5 2.4
77 Office of Labor-Management Standards (DOL) 57.4 -0.3
78 Office of the Inspector General (Commerce) 57.3 18.4
79 U.S. Special Operations Command (Army) 57.2 -1.3
79 Administration for Community Living (HHS) 57.2 --
81 Office of Energy Market Regulation (FERC) 57.0 --
82 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (HHS) 56.7 -1.4
82 Missile Defense Agency (DOD) 56.7 4.8
84 Global Strike Command (Air Force) 56.5 0.5
85 Food Nutrition and Consumer Services (USDA) 56.2 3.4
86 Bureau of the Public Debt (Treasury) 56.1 -3.6
87 National Technical Information Service (Commerce) 55.9 --
88 Office of Management (ED) 55.8 -8.7
88 Region 8 - Denver (EPA) 55.8 -2.1
88 Civil Rights Division (DOJ) 55.8 0.2
91 Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL) 55.7 -4.2
91 U.S. Army Acquisition Support Center (Army) 55.7 -2.5
93 Air Combat Command (Air Force) 55.6 -1.9
94 Office of Naval Research (Navy) 55.5 -0.3
94 National Cemetery Administration (VA) 55.5 0.0
94 U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/U.S. Army Forces Strategic Command (Army) 55.5 9.9
97 Air Force Audit Agency (Air Force) 55.4 -4.1
97 United States Coast Guard (DHS) 55.4 -2.3
97 U.S. Trustees Program (DOJ) 55.4 -1.7
100 Air Force Special Operations Command (Air Force) 55.2 -4.0
100 Wage and Hour Division (DOL) 55.2 -2.4
100 Office of the Secretary (Commerce) 55.2 2.7
103 U.S. Mint (Treasury) 54.9 -2.1
103 Office of the Secretary (DOT) 54.9 -1.1
105 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT) 54.8 -3.1
105 Institute of Education Sciences (ED) 54.8 --
107 Region 7 - Kansas City (EPA) 54.7 -2.9
107 Drug Enforcement Administration (DOJ) 54.7 0.0
109 Office of Energy Projects (FERC) 54.6 --
110 Naval Air Systems Command (Navy) 54.5 -0.5
111 Office of the Chief Information Officer (OPM) 54.4 -0.1
111 Executive Office of U.S. Attorneys and U.S. Attorneys (DOJ) 54.4 1.4
111 Departmental Offices (Treasury) 54.4 2.1
111 Agricultural Marketing Service (USDA) 54.4 --
115 Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (HHS) 54.2 -3.9
116 Office of Justice Programs (DOJ) 54.1 -2.1
116 Naval Supply Systems Command (Navy) 54.1 0.5
118 Justice Management Division (DOJ) 54.0 0.1
118 Naval Medical Command (Navy) 54.0 1.5
118 All Other Components (Air Force) 54.0 --
121 U.S. Army Forces Command (Army) 53.9 -5.2
121 Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (ED) 53.9 1.8
121 Region 2 - New York (EPA) 53.9 3.9
124 Office of the Solicitor (DOL) 53.8 -6.4
124 Pacific Air Forces (Air Force) 53.8 0.4
124 Air National Guard Support Center (Air Force) 53.8 4.3
127 Naval Sea Systems Command (Navy) 53.7 0.5
127 Headquarters - Air Force Reserve (Air Force) 53.7 3.2
129 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (DOL) 53.6 -2.0
129 U.S. Atlantic Fleet - Commander In Chief (Navy) 53.6 0.2
131 Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (DHS) 53.4 1.1
131 Field Operating Agencies of the Army Staff Resourced Through OA-22 (Army) 53.4 1.4
133 Food and Drug Administration (HHS) 53.3 -3.0
134 U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (Army) 53.2 -0.2
135 Assistant for Administration - Under Secretary of the Navy (Navy) 53.1 -2.5
136 Office of the Secretary of the Army (Army) 53.0 0.5
136 Office of the Chief Information Officer (GSA) 53.0 1.7
138 Air Force Elements, U.S. Northern Command (Air Force) 52.9 -4.5
138 Federal Bureau of Investigation (DOJ) 52.9 1.3
140 Headquarters and Support Elements (Air Force) 52.8 -7.9
141 Citizenship and Immigration Services (DHS) 52.7 0.8
142 Air Force Elements, U.S. Special Operations Command (Air Force) 52.6 -2.0
143 U.S. Army Reserve Command (Army) 52.5 1.1
143 Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DOD) 52.5 3.5
145 National Institutes of Health (HHS) 52.4 -4.1
145 Air Mobility Command (Air Force) 52.4 -3.8
145 Bureau of the Census (Commerce) 52.4 -1.2
148 Naval Facilities Engineering Command (Navy) 52.3 0.3
149 National Institute of Standards and Technology (Commerce) 52.2 -0.4
150 Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (Navy) 52.1 -3.3
150 Bureau of Naval Personnel (Navy) 52.1 -2.5
150 Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA) 52.1 -1.7
150 Defense Contract Management Agency (DOD) 52.1 -1.4
150 U.S. Geological Survey (Interior) 52.1 1.7
155 Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA) 52.0 -2.8
155 Federal Aviation Administration (DOT) 52.0 1.9
155 Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DOD) 52.0 5.3
158 Office of the Inspector General (DHS) 51.9 -8.2
158 Office of the General Counsel (GSA) 51.9 --
160 U.S. Pacific Fleet - Commander In Chief (Navy) 51.8 -3.1
160 Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (Interior) 51.8 2.9
162 Office of the Secretary (HHS) 51.6 -3.1
163 Office for Civil Rights (ED) 51.5 1.7
164 Region 6 - Dallas (EPA) 51.4 -2.0
165 Region 9 - San Francisco (EPA) 51.3 -5.0
165 Veterans Benefits Administration (VA) 51.3 1.7
167 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Interior) 51.2 -1.8
168 Office of Community Planning and Development (HUD) 51.1 -2.1
168 Air Force Elements, U.S. Strategic Command (Air Force) 51.1 -1.6
168 National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA) 51.1 --
171 U.S. Army, Pacific (Army) 51.0 -1.6
172 Office of the Chief of the National Guard Bureau (Army) 50.9 -1.0
172 Antitrust Division (DOJ) 50.9 11.5
174 Defense Information Systems Agency (DOD) 50.7 -2.8
174 Farm Service Agency (USDA) 50.7 -1.4
176 Defense Human Resources Activity (DOD) 50.6 2.6
177 Employee Benefits Security Administration (DOL) 50.5 -4.5
177 Region 1 - Boston (EPA) 50.5 -2.0
179 Federal Student Aid (ED) 50.4 -0.7
180 U.S. Air Force Academy (Air Force) 50.3 -8.3
180 Criminal Division (DOJ) 50.3 11.6
182 Programs - Staff - Field Offices (DOE) 50.2 --
183 Marine Corps (Navy) 50.1 -0.4
183 U.S. Army Military District of Washington (Army) 50.1 5.0
185 Office of Air and Radiation (EPA) 50.0 -2.3
185 Air Force Materiel Command (Air Force) 50.0 -0.3
187 Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (DOT) 49.9 0.7
187 Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer (GSA) 49.9 2.2
187 Civil Engineering Center (Air Force) 49.9 --
190 Risk Management Agency (USDA) 49.8 -4.2
190 U.S. Military Entrance Processing Command (Army) 49.8 0.1
192 Office of the Chief Financial Officer (EPA) 49.7 -2.3
193 Office of the Inspector General (DOJ) 49.6 -6.6
193 Military Sealift Command (Navy) 49.6 -5.2
193 Executive Office for Immigration Review (DOJ) 49.6 -2.3
193 U.S. Marshals Service (DOJ) 49.6 1.6
193 Washington Headquarters Services (DOD) 49.6 --
198 Departmental Administration (USDA) 49.4 -2.0
198 Agricultural Research Service (USDA) 49.4 2.1
200 Office of Policy Development and Research (HUD) 49.2 -9.6
200 Space Command (Air Force) 49.2 -0.8
200 Office of the Chief Financial Officer (HUD) 49.2 2.8
203 Air Education and Training Command (Air Force) 49.1 -4.1
203 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Army) 49.1 -3.7
203 National Telecommunications and Information Administration (Commerce) 49.1 1.0
206 U.S. Army, Europe (Army) 49.0 -3.8
206 Air National Guard Units (Mobilization) (Title 5) (Air Force) 49.0 -3.5
206 Financial Management Service (Treasury) 49.0 -0.8
209 Immediate Office of the Chief-of-Staff of the Army (Army) 48.9 -6.7
209 Commander - Navy Installations (Navy) 48.9 0.7
211 Department of Defense Education Activity (DOD) 48.7 -3.4
211 Bureau of Land Management (Interior) 48.7 -0.9
213 Office of the General Counsel (HUD) 48.6 -6.1
213 Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (ED) 48.6 -2.3
213 U.S. Army Medical Command (Army) 48.6 -1.3
213 Administration for Children and Families (HHS) 48.6 -0.8
213 International Trade Administration (Commerce) 48.6 1.5
218 Office of the Secretary of the Interior (Interior) 48.5 -2.6
219 Federal Transit Administration (DOT) 48.3 -10.0
220 Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (DOL) 48.1 -3.2
220 Veterans Health Administration (VA) 48.1 -2.2
220 U.S. Army Installation Management Agency (Army) 48.1 -0.5
220 Bureau of Reclamation (Interior) 48.1 -0.1
220 Maritime Administration (DOT) 48.1 1.5
225 Office of the General Counsel (USDA) 48.0 5.5
226 Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity (HUD) 47.9 -2.4
226 Bureau of Prisons/Federal Prison System (DOJ) 47.9 0.0
226 Community Supervision Program (CSOSA) 47.9 --
229 U.S. Army Materiel Command (Army) 47.6 -3.0
229 Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration (USDA) 47.6 --
231 Assistant Secretary for Housing - Federal Housing Commissioner (HUD) 47.5 -6.7
232 TRICARE Management Activity (DOD) 47.3 -4.3
233 Rural Development (USDA) 47.1 -1.8
234 Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management (DOL) 46.9 -3.4
234 Office of the Inspector General (DOD) 46.9 --
236 Office of Public and Indian Housing (HUD) 46.8 -7.8
236 U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command (Army) 46.8 -6.6
238 Office of Research and Development (EPA) 46.7 -6.5
238 Mine Safety and Health Administration (DOL) 46.7 -3.2
240 Power Marketing Administrations (DOE) 46.3 -1.0
241 Office of the Administrator (EPA) 46.2 -10.7
242 Immediate Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (Navy) 46.1 -2.1
243 Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA) 46.0 --
244 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (Commerce) 45.8 -1.4
244 Office of Environmental Information (EPA) 45.8 0.0
246 Headquarters Air Intelligence Agency (Air Force) 45.6 -4.8
246 All Other Components (DOJ) 45.6 --
248 Veterans Employment and Training Services (DOL) 45.5 3.9
249 Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (DOL) 45.4 0.9
250 Central Office (VA) 44.9 -7.3
250 Office of Water (EPA) 44.9 -6.4
252 Naval Intelligence Command (Navy) 44.8 -0.8
253 Management Directorate (DHS) 44.7 -7.5
254 International Broadcasting Bureau (BBG) 44.4 -7.6
255 Secret Service (DHS) 44.3 -7.3
255 Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco Firearms and Explosives (DOJ) 44.3 4.1
257 Employment and Training Administration (DOL) 44.2 -8.2
258 U.S. Army Central (Army) 43.9 --
259 Office of Enforcement Compliance Assurance (EPA) 43.8 -4.7
259 Office of the Inspector General (DOL) 43.8 -3.7
261 Air Force Personnel Center (Air Force) 43.6 -11.1
262 Joint Services and Activities Supported By the Office, Secretary of the Army (Army) 43.5 -4.4
263 National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE) 43.2 -7.4
263 Office of Cuba Broadcasting (BBG) 43.2 --
265 Region 10 - Seattle (EPA) 43.1 -12.3
265 Air Force District of Washington (Air Force) 43.1 -8.6
265 Region 5 - Chicago (EPA) 43.1 -6.9
265 Federal Emergency Management Agency (DHS) 43.1 -2.8
269 National Park Service (Interior) 42.9 -2.5
269 U.S. Army Netcom/9th Army Signal Command (Army) 42.9 -2.4
269 Office of Chief Procurement Officer (HUD) 42.9 --
272 Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer (HUD) 42.6 -10.5
273 U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command (Army) 42.4 0.8
274 U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command (Army) 42.2 -2.5
274 National Agricultural Statistics Service (USDA) 42.2 3.7
276 Office of Surface Mining (Interior) 41.7 -2.6
276 U.S. Army North (Army) 41.7 --
278 Defense Commissary Agency (DOD) 41.6 -0.8
279 Indian Health Service (HHS) 41.3 -1.9
280 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (HHS) 41.1 -4.4
281 Office of the Secretary (DHS) 41.0 -7.0
282 Intelligence and Analysis (DHS) 40.5 -0.4
283 Forest Service (USDA) 40.3 -3.8
284 Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (EPA) 40.1 -13.9
285 Voice of America (BBG) 39.9 7.6
286 Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (Interior) 39.1 -8.7
286 Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention (EPA) 39.1 -6.5
288 Office of Chief Information Officer (HUD) 38.4 0.3
289 Foreign Agricultural Service (USDA) 38.3 -1.2
290 Transportation Security Administration (DHS) 37.2 -0.8
291 Administrative Law Judges (DOL) 36.3 --
292 Customs and Border Protection (DHS) 35.4 -8.9
293 Bureau of Indian Affairs (Interior) 35.3 -1.9
294 Office of Postsecondary Education (ED) 35.1 -7.8
295 Immigration and Customs Enforcement (DHS) 34.5 -1.7
296 National Protection and Programs Directorate (DHS) 33.7 -6.2
297 Office of the Solicitor (Interior) 33.2 -7.3
298 Economic Development Administration (Commerce) 31.6 -12.0
299 Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (Treasury) 31.5 -16.7
300 Office of the Under Secretary for Science and Technology (DHS) 28.0 -8.4
N/A U.S. Army Audit Agency (Army) -- --

-- Not available

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1 Deloitte Consulting LLP, “Silencing the static: Engaging employees in an unsettled environment,” July 2014.

2 Data available for 2009 and 2013 for 56 out of 71 large, mid-size and small agencies.

3 Partnership for Public Service, “Private Sector Comparison,” The Best Places to Work in the Federal Government 2013 Rankings, (accessed 24 July 2014).

4 Deloitte Consulting LLP, “Silencing the static: Engaging employees in an unsettled environment,” July 2014.